About 37 percent of young people between the ages of 12 and 17 have been bullied online* and when bystanders intervene, bullying stops within 10 seconds 57% of the time**.

Join CONNECT Summit County for a free screening of The Upstanders on Monday, March 2 at 6:30 p.m. at the Jim Santy Auditorium.

The Upstanders is a compelling documentary that addresses cyber-bullying, bullying among friends, families, co-workers and the brain science behind it all. The film highlights new laws and programs already reducing bullying in schools and shows us how we can learn to make a difference together. Anti-bullying advocates believe there is power in watching out for each other as a community and power to change if we give permission to talk about it.

The screening comes at a critically important time in Utah. On Jan. 9, the State Board of Education sent a proposal to a committee to weaken Utah’s anti-bullying legislation and remove provisions that provide teacher training in combating bullying. The board’s Law and Licensing Committee is scheduled to review the proposed changes at its public meeting in March.

An Upstander is someone who takes action when they witness bullying. Even one person’s support can make a big difference for someone who is being bullied. When youth who are bullied are defended and supported by their peers, they are less anxious and depressed than those who are not.

The Upstanders is 50 minutes long and following the film, Park City High School graduate Robby Borders will share his “Smile, You Are Beautiful” story. Robby has been impacted by bullying and suicide throughout his life and he has a powerful message of overcoming tragedy through resiliency.

Please join us for this documentary about resilience and the power of connection to end bullying. 

*DoSomething.org / CyberBullying.org

**Hawkins, D.  L., Pepler, D., and Craig, W. M. (2001). Peer interventions in playground bullying. Social  Development, 10, 512-527.

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